Wednesday, September 19, 2018

September Grades 5-6 Book Club: The Evil Wizard Smallbone



For September's Grades 5-6 Book Club, we read The Evil Wizard Smallbone by Delia Sherman. Anthony, J.T., Madison and Reagan were present. Here's some of what we talked about!


Did you like Nick at the beginning of this book? Is he someone you might want to be friends with?
-I'm not sure I'd want to be friends with a manipulative liar.
-Yes, I would want to be friends with him because I can relate to him. I lie a lot to my brothers.



Why did Nick lie to the wizard about his name and abilities? 

-He didn't trust him.
-Anything he did wrong would be put under Jerry's name.
-Because he didn't want to learn anything he wasn't supposed to know.



How does Dinah use science? Are you interested in science?

-Yes. When I grow up I want to be a marine biologist or a biochemist.
-I want to be a nuclear engineer.
-I want to be a paleontologist.
-I want to be an animator.


Why doesn’t the wizard fix Miss Rachel’s legs?

-Maybe he doesn't know how.
-Because she didn't deserve it.
-Maybe the other Evil Wizard did it and the new one didn't know how to fix them.


Why is Nick’s totem a fox? If you had a totem, what would it be? 

-He's sly and clever.
-He can manipulate people.
-A Persian cat, because I've always wanted to be sleeping.
-A raven, because 1. my name almost rhymes with raven 2. I love the dark too much 3. I love to be alone, like ravens 4. Ravens love to play in the snow, as do I 5. ravens are big birds, as am I (tall)
-A rock because 1. I would be able to see everything 2. rocks can be big and I'm really big 3. Rocks are everywhere, as am I



What kind of Contract would you have made with the Evil Wizard?

-One that lets me sleep forever. My agreement is not snore.
-Turn me into a house pet and I'll be cool.
-If you teach me magic for three months, you'll never have to see me again.




What were the sentries that protected Smallbone Cove? Why have the townspeople stopped taking care of the Sentries? 
-They forgot.
-Fidelou stopped attacking Smallbone Cove so the people didn't think there was any reason to do so.
-The Wall, the Stream, the Lantern and the Weathervane 



Invent some sentries of your own. How would you keep Smallbone Cove safe?

-The bed. The werewolves would sleep in it.
-A minigun with lead.
-For Earth, I would make a tree. Whenever the leaves started to die, the people would have to start caring for it so the leaves wouldn't fall off. Or make it like the Whomping Willow. The Wind sentry would be a bird. A statue that sensed werewolves or howling coyotes presence, it would alert the town. It would have to be sparkling clean all the time. For Water, it would be a huge Koi pond that, if it sensed werewolves, it would send a wave in their direction. Fire sentry would be a campfire with a fire pit. The people would need to put a magical ingredient under the wood to keep the fire burning.
-The element of annoyance (making farting sounds).


The people of Smallbone Cove are really seals. The Evil Wizard has their sealskins, which keeps them in human form. In Gaelic mythology, such seal-people are known as selkies. Selkies were not always good. Can you think of a mythological creature that is similar?

-Centaur
-Unicorn (think of its horn and how many things it can impale)
-A harpy (half bird half woman)
-Griffin
-Dragon



Why don’t all the transformed apprentices want to stay human? 

-Because they are used to being what they were as an animal.



Was the Evil Wizard really evil? 

-Weeeeeellllllll
-The current Smallbone was not too bad compared to past Evil Wizards.
-Smallbone was into transformation but not for a long period of time. He didn't have the willpower to transform them for long.



Rank book 1-5, with 1 being one of the worst books you've ever read and 5 being one of the best.

-One 3
-Two 4s
-One 5

For October's Book Club, we will read Posted by John David Anderson.


When cell phones are banned at their school, students start communicating through sticky notes left all over the school, triggering a wave of bullying activities in the wake of a new girl's arrival.

Copies of the book will be available at the Circulation Desk roughly 4 days after this book club. Please be sure to register for the club and pick up your copy of the book!




***

If you liked The Evil Wizard Smallbone, you might enjoy:

Gidwitz, Adam. A Tale Dark and Grimm. Puffin Books, 2011

Goldman, William. The Princess Bride. Harcourt, 2007

White, T.H. The Sword in the Stone. Philomel Books, 1993.

Monday, September 17, 2018

October Grades 5-6 Book Suggestions

Ghost by Jason Reynolds

Ghost wants to be the fastest sprinter on his elite middle school track team, but his past is slowing him down in this first electrifying novel of a brand-new series from Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award–winning author Jason Reynolds.

Ghost. Lu. Patina. Sunny. Four kids from wildly different backgrounds with personalities that are explosive when they clash. But they are also four kids chosen for an elite middle school track team—a team that could qualify them for the Junior Olympics if they can get their acts together. They all have a lot to lose, but they also have a lot to prove, not only to each other, but to themselves.




Once Was a Time by Leila Sales

In World War II England, ten-year-old Lottie is transported via a portal to present day Wisconsin, where she must find her way back to her family and her best friend, Kitty.



Posted by John David Anderson

When cell phones are banned at their school, students start communicating through sticky notes left all over the school, triggering a wave of bullying activities in the wake of a new girl's arrival.



Restart by Gordon Korman

Chase does not remember falling off the roof, in fact he does not remember anything about himself, and when he gets back to middle school he begins to learn who he was through the reactions of the other kids--trouble is, he really is not sure he likes the Chase that is being revealed, but can he take the opportunity amnesia has provided and restart his life?



The Skeleton Tree by Iain Lawrence

Less than forty-eight hours after twelve-year-old Chris sets off on a sailing trip down the Alaskan coast with his uncle, their boat sinks. The only survivors are Chris and a boy named Frank, who hates Chris immediately. Chris and Frank have no radio, no flares, no food. Suddenly, they’ve got to forage, fish, and scavenge the shore for supplies.
 
Because as the days get colder and the salmon migration ends, survival will take more than sheer force of will. Eventually, in the wilderness of Alaska, the boys discover an improbable bond—and the compassion that might truly be the path to rescue.



Thursday, January 18, 2018

January Grades 5-6 Book Club: Beyond the Bright Sea




For January's Book Club, we read Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk. Anthony, Claire, Emma, Madison, Maida, Reagan and Ryan were present. Here's what we talked about, based on suggestions from Penguin Books were the publisher.


Osh says, “I ended up here because my country was not really my country. It was just where I lived. Where some of us were less than others. Where it was sport, to hurt us.” (pg. 87) What do you think happened that caused him to leave everything behind? What challenges did he face when starting a new life on a small isolated island?

-Germany
-He's very calm and maybe he left somewhere where people were bullying him
-He could be from Germany and be Jewish.
-Finding things to build with, eat, sustain himself


The island itself could be considered a major character in the story. Describe the “personality” of the island. How does the island interact with the other characters and influence their actions?

-Through my eyes, I would see it as a friendly personality and loving. They treat the whole island as their home.
-The island gives them a home.
-Crow and Osh have a symbiotic relationship with the island.



What evidence do you have that the story happens in 1925? Do you think this story could have taken place in the present? Explain why or why not.

-When they went into the city, there weren't cars or airplanes.
-There were no cell phones.
-There were no bridges; you had to take a ferry.
-There were telegrams.
-They wrote letters to each other and didn't text.
-The story itself could have happened in modern times.


Crow comes to this realization on page 271: “I dried myself off and put on some clean clothes, amazed by the power of such small accomplishments to restore my good mood.” What do you think she means by this statement? Describe a situation where this was true for you.

-I felt happy with myself when I finished a small detail on one of my drawings.
-When I ran a race (3 miles) and made a goal not to stop, I didn't. And that felt really good.



Why do names have such profound meaning for Osh and Crow? What physical and behavioral characteristics does Crow share with her feathered namesake? If you were named for an animal, which one would it be and why?

-She has a pointy nose and black hair.
-She has a feather on her cheek.
-As a baby, her cry was almost like a crow.
-Because they come from different places from where they are now.
-Crow wants to know where she comes from and who she is while Osh just wants to forget.
-Raven because it sounds similar to my name and it describes my personality; I would love to fly. Raven's are a little mysterious.
-I would be a pet rock. It's my spirit animal. Rocks get to see everything occur over millions of years and there are pieces of them all over the world. I'm an observer and so are they.
-I would be named after a husky because I love the outdoors, snow and I like to talk. Huskies love to talk.
-Raccoons keep popping into my head.
-I'd be a tiger because they are just so bold and they love to swim.
-I would be an underwater creature that is alive for a long time. I like that because they get to observe.

Crow says on page 7: “When I asked questions about pearls or tides, he [Osh] did his best to answer them. But when I looked beyond our life on the islands, he became the moon itself, bent on tugging me back, as if I were made of sea instead of blood.” Why is Osh so reluctant to talk to Crow about her past? Do you feel he is right to withhold information from Crow? Explain why or why not.

-He knows information that he doesn't want her to know.
-He might think that she might not be able to process the information the right way.
-Osh might be afraid that she'll leave him if she finds a "better" family.



Why do you think Crow said she “carried those questions [about her past] around…like a sack that got heavier as the years went by, even though I had become accustomed to the idea of it. Even though I was not unhappy with the life I had. I just wanted to know. To understand. To put the sack down.” (pg. 11) Why do you think Crow needs to know where she came from? Do you think she would have been better off not knowing? Explain why or why not.

-I think it's good that she knows where she's from.
-She wanted to know because she probably would have wondered and tortured herself with questioning.
-I think it would have been better if she didn't know. Knowing the truth might have been too hard for her.
-It would be better if she didn't find out. She talked about it all the time, ignoring Miss Maggie and Osh's feelings.


How do Osh and Crow change each other’s lives? How would things have been different if Osh hadn’t been the one to find Crow floating on the raft?

-Crow might not have lived if Osh hadn't found her.
-Osh must have guessed that she came from an island close by.




Please rate this book between 1 and 5. 

-One 3
-Two 4s
-Four 5s




For February's Book Club, we will be reading The Wonderling by Mira Bartok. 

Welcome to the Home for Wayward and Misbegotten Creatures, an institution run by evil Miss Carbunkle, a cunning villainess who believes her terrified young charges exist only to serve and suffer. Part animal and part human, the groundlings toil in classroom and factory, forbidden to enjoy anything regular children have, most particularly singing and music. For the Wonderling, an innocent-hearted, one-eared, fox-like eleven-year-old with only a number rather than a proper name — a 13 etched on a medallion around his neck — it is the only home he has ever known. But unexpected courage leads him to acquire the loyalty of a young bird groundling named Trinket, who gives the Home’s loneliest inhabitant two incredible gifts: a real name — Arthur, like the good king in the old stories — and a best friend. Using Trinket’s ingenious invention, the pair escape over the wall and embark on an adventure that will take them out into the wider world and ultimately down the path of sweet Arthur’s true destiny. 


We will meet on Wednesday, February 21 at 3:00 p.m. Please pick up your copy of the book at the Circulation Desk (as well as register) a few days after the January session.


Wednesday, December 20, 2017

December Grades 5-6 Book Club: The Giver



For December's Book Club, we read The Giver by Lois Lowry. Claire, Emma, Kamea, Madison and Reagan were present. Here's some of what we discussed.

We had such an amazing conversation today centered on The Giver. It was so thoughtful and insightful that I didn't want to break the flow by typing what we discussed. The questions below formed the basis for our conversation but we went into a lot of philosophical "stuff" that can't be covered here. Needless to say, these kids put a lot of thought into the book and what it means to have free will. I am so impressed with these guys. :)




If you were attending the Ceremony of Twelve with Jonas, what Assignment do you think the Elders would select for you?


Jonas’s community has a lot of rules. Do you think that’s a good thing or a bad thing? Why?


What do you think of how families in Jonas’s community are formed?


Would you rather be selected, as Jonas was, or assigned, as his groupmates were?


Can you imagine giving up such things as snow and hills because they are impractical?


Do you agree with Jonas that people have to be protected from wrong choices? 


Do you agree that painful memories are made easier when they are shared? Do you think it’s fair that one person in the community—The Receiver—should have to be burdened and pained by memories so that no one else is?


Do you think the elderly should be part of the community, or separate, as in Jonas’s community? 


What do you think of what Jonas’s community calls “release”? Were you surprised at what it was?


Jonas knows that if his plan fails, he could be killed. But he believes that if he stays, his life is no longer worth living. Do you agree?


Jonas briefly wonders whether he made the wrong choice when he decided to run away. What do you think?


Although most of the memories have left Jonas, the feelings have not. Why do you think that is?


How do you think the story ends?


Rate this book between 1 and 5:

-Three 4s
-Two 5s


For January's Book Club, we will be reading Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk.

"Twelve-year-old Crow has lived her entire life on a tiny, isolated piece of the starkly beautiful Elizabeth Islands in Massachusetts. Abandoned and set adrift in a small boat when she was just hours old, Crow's only companions are Osh, the man who rescued and raised her, and Miss Maggie, their fierce and affectionate neighbor across the sandbar. Crow has always been curious about the world around her, but it isn't until the night a mysterious fire appears across the water that the unspoken question of her own history forms in her heart. Soon, an unstoppable chain of events is triggered, leading Crow down a path of discovery and danger." -- (Source of summary not specified)


We will meet on Wednesday, January 17 at 3:00 p.m. Please remember to register for Book Club and pick up your copy of the book at the Circulation Desk a few days after the previous month's meeting.

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

January Grades 5-6 Book Suggestions


Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk JANUARY
Twelve-year-old Crow has lived her entire life on a tiny, isolated piece of the starkly beautiful Elizabeth Islands in Massachusetts. Abandoned and set adrift in a small boat when she was just hours old, Crow’s only companions are Osh, the man who rescued and raised her, and Miss Maggie, their fierce and affectionate neighbor across the sandbar.

Crow has always been curious about the world around her, but it isn’t until the night a mysterious fire appears across the water that the unspoken question of her own history forms in her heart. Soon, an unstoppable chain of events is triggered, leading Crow down a path of discovery and danger.


Number the Stars by Lois Lowry


As the German troops begin their campaign to "relocate" all the Jews of Denmark, Annemarie Johansen’s family takes in Annemarie’s best friend, Ellen Rosen, and conceals her as part of the family.
Through the eyes of ten-year-old Annemarie, we watch as the Danish Resistance smuggles almost the entire Jewish population of Denmark, nearly seven thousand people, across the sea to Sweden. The heroism of an entire nation reminds us that there was pride and human decency in the world even during a time of terror and war.


Ben Coffin has never been one for making friends. As a former foster kid, he knows people can up and leave without so much as a goodbye. Ben prefers to spend his time with the characters in his favorite sci-fi books…until he rescues an abandoned mutt from the alley next-door to the Coney Island Library. Scruffy little Flip leads Ben to befriend a fellow book-lover named Halley—yes, like the comet—a girl unlike anyone he has ever met. Ben begins thinking of her as “Rainbow Girl” because of her crazy-colored clothes and her laugh, pure magic, the kind that makes you smile away the stormiest day.  Rainbow Girl convinces Ben to write a novel with her.  But as their story unfolds Ben’s life begins to unravel, and Ben must discover for himself the truth about friendship and the meaning of home.



The Wonderling by Mira Bartok FEBRUARY

Welcome to the Home for Wayward and Misbegotten Creatures, an institution run by evil Miss Carbunkle, a cunning villainess who believes her terrified young charges exist only to serve and suffer. Part animal and part human, the groundlings toil in classroom and factory, forbidden to enjoy anything regular children have, most particularly singing and music. For the Wonderling, an innocent-hearted, one-eared, fox-like eleven-year-old with only a number rather than a proper name — a 13 etched on a medallion around his neck — it is the only home he has ever known. But unexpected courage leads him to acquire the loyalty of a young bird groundling named Trinket, who gives the Home’s loneliest inhabitant two incredible gifts: a real name — Arthur, like the good king in the old stories — and a best friend. Using Trinket’s ingenious invention, the pair escape over the wall and embark on an adventure that will take them out into the wider world and ultimately down the path of sweet Arthur’s true destiny. 


Thursday, November 16, 2017

November Grades 5-6 Book Club: Anne of Green Gables


For November's Book Club, we chose to read Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Madison, Maida and Reagan were present. Here is some of what we discussed.


In chapter 2, when Matthew is driving Anne back to Green Gables, she asks him: “Isn’t it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive” (p. 16). Given her tragic childhood, how do you think Anne is able to maintain such a positive attitude?

-She has an opportunity in front of her with new people and she's hoping it will be good
-She wants to think about what's in front of her
-She wants to forget her past



From the moment she arrives in Avonlea, Anne is insistent on renaming places and inanimate things. Barry’s Pond, for example, becomes “The Lake of Shining Waters” and Marilla’s geranium becomes “Bonny.” Why do you think she does this? 

-Because she feels that they are living things that deserve to have names
-They should have names that are interesting
-She thinks that a lot of names are too plain




Marilla gives several reasons for finally deciding to keep Anne. What reason do you think most changed her mind? 

-She is so passionate
-She proved herself
-She helps them and respects their family



Anne has a fascination with imagination and with helping others develop a vivid one.  How is her imagination a benefit to her?  How does it cause her problems?

-Her imagination keeps her occupied. She can imagine things that she wants to be (puffy sleeves)
-Amethyst brooch: she tries to make things interesting but then things can get out of hand
-Playing Elaine, she gets into trouble



Why is it important to Anne that everyone spell her name with an "e" ?  What does this mean to her?

-She thinks it makes it sound more sophisticated
-She thinks "Ann" is too common



Good behavior is very important to Marilla and very difficult for Anne. From where do you think each derives her moral code? How do both characters change, when it comes to behavior? Think, in particular, of Anne’s confessions. 


-Anne tries to make the best of life
-Marilla might be happy with being so rigid in how she does things and thinks of things
-Having Anne become a part of the family allowed Marilla to become more flexible



Throughout the novel, Anne often compares her clothing to that of her friends and other people in town.  What does fashion represent to Anne and why is it so important to her?

-So she can fit in. She doesn't fit in with the red hair and freckles. 
-So she can feel more comfortable
-She came to town in rags and so she's happy to forget that person she was



Anne is a remarkably compassionate child and is able to forgive even those who have judged her unfairly, such as Mrs. Rachel Lynde or Mrs. Barry. Why, then, do you think she holds such a grudge against Gilbert Blythe? 

-He insulted her
-She liked him and she was pushed down by her crush more than she was by Mrs. Lynde
-I agree with Reagan but it could be anything. Gilbert is 11 when he made fun of Anne and she's less forgiving of him. Mrs. Rachel Lynde is older and, even though she should know better, she is trustworthy and should be forgiven.



Discuss Anne’s reaction to Matthew’s death. How do you think it shows her maturation? How, if at all, do you think she was prepared for it? 

-I don't think she was prepared for it at all
-She was in shock and couldn't cry
-She almost thought it was a nightmare
-She was trying to be grown-up



At the end of the book, Rachel Lynde tells Marilla, “There’s a good deal of the child about her yet in some ways,” and Marilla responds by saying, “There’s a good deal more of the woman about her in others” (p. 285). What do you make of her comment? How has Anne changed during her time at Green Gables? How has she stayed the same?

-She got better at holding her tongue. Her creativity and imagination have stayed the same
-She didn't outgrow her imagination
-She's learned more responsibility
-She has learned not to make as many mistakes
-She doesn't talk as much



Anne of Green Gables was written over a century ago, yet it continues to capture the hearts of children of all ages.  What qualities in the writing style or story explain the timeless, universal appeal of this novel?

-The descriptions are so good
-It's great
-There are a lot of similes and sayings
-It's about friendship and growing up
-It's about kindred spirits and bosom friends



Did you enjoy the book?  Why or why not?

-I loved it
-I loved it
-I loved it
-5
-5
-5


Have you seen a movie version of Anne of Green Gables?  How does it compare?

-We're just watching it right now
-It's a little boring


For December's Book Club, we will be reading The Giver by Lois Lowry.


Given his lifetime assignment at the Ceremony of Twelve, Jonas becomes the receiver of memories shared by only one other in his community and discovers the terrible truth about the society in which he lives.

The next book club will be meeting on Wednesday, December 20 at 3:00 p.m. Please pick up your library copies of the book, and register, at the Circulation Desk so that Miss Lisa knows how many readers to expect!




Wednesday, October 18, 2017

October Grades 5-6 Book Club: The Candymakers


For October's Book Club, we read The Candymakers by Wendy Mass. Anthony, Claire, Emma, Madison, Maida and Reagan were present. Here's a little bit of what we discussed.


Whose perspective is The Candymakers told from?

-Everybody
-Alternating


What was your favorite room or what room do you wish the Life is Sweet candy factory had?

-A room where they made caramel popsicles.
-A room of bread.
-A puppy pool party room.
-Nutella and chocolate room. Bread is on the floor.
-I wish it had a chocolate birthday party room. 
-A extended library.
-An animal rescue center.
-A room where it snowed sugar all day (Sugar Globe Room).
-Tropical room was a favorite.


What did each character (Logan, Miles, Daisy, Phillip) submit for the contest?

-Daisy submitted her 3 Gs.
-Harmonicandy
-Logan submitted the chocolate rocket.
-Miles submitted a peach cobbler.
-Alex Gruber submitted ice cream.


What is the “big mystery” in The Candymakers? The small ones? Clues given?

-The big secret is who wins the contest and what is the background of everybody.
-What was the secret ingredient?
-How did Logan get his scars? 
-What was Philip writing in his book?
-I was wondering why Philip was so picky.


What did you think the secret ingredient was?

-I thought it was a mix of dry ingredients.
-I thought it was purple sprinkles.
-I thought they put a little bit of mashed up cocoa beans.
-I thought it could be some kind of thing that isn't real with a crazy name because this seems like that kind of story.


What is each character’s motive for entering the contest? Do their motives change? If so, how?

-Daisy's motive is to get the secret ingredient and get out. Her motive only changed when they got to know each other.
-Logan was trying to carry on the family tradition.
-Miles was entered by the librarian of the town.
-Logan's motive went from winning to losing (so that he could save the factory).
-Philip's motive went from simply just winning to letting others help him so that he could prove his father wrong.


Why does Phillip have to win? If you were Logan, Daisy, or Miles, would you work with Phillip and let him win? Do you think Phillip would have won without their help?

-He has to win because his father will destroy the factory otherwise. 
-If I were one of the other characters, I would probably help him.
-He probably wouldn't have won without their help.
-Philip was almost afraid of what would happen if he ended up being at the front of the pack without other support.


A butterfly appears several times throughout the book. What could the butterfly represent?

-Change
-Happiness
-Hope


If you could create your own candy what would it be called? What ingredients would you use?

-I'm not going to create one.
-The Scream, made out of dark chocolate and grey caramel to look like a movie screen.
-I would call it Bullets, made out of a small layer of caramel coated with dark chocolate (bullet-size) coated with silver edible paint.
-I'd make a flute that works made out of all of the chocolates, caramel, cookies...any form of chocolate and cookies. That might be hard to make the keys move. 
-I would make a gummy-based candy but I'm not sure what it was called.
-I would make a giant piece of candy as big as this room made out of all of the candies in the world.
-Something with a gummy bottom so if you dropped it from the sky for a poor nation, it won't break or hurt them.
-A house made out of candy, like Hansel and Gretel. I would make a Village of Candy with Anthony, The Candymaker, as the mayor.


Why does Henry help Philip so much in the story?

-Because he's a good person.
-Maybe he recognized him from the accident.


The kids all became friends at the end of the book, kind of unexpectedly. Have you ever become friends with those you didn't expect to.

-The kids told their stories.

Who is your favorite character and why?

-Daisy because she's a spy.
-Daisy because she's unexpected.
-Logan because most of his life is pretty much secret, like his scars.
-Daisy because she's a spy and lives in a mansion.
-Daisy because she has spy gadgets.
-Philip because he's Philip and Daisy because she reminds him of my lifelong hero, James Bond.


Favorite/least favorite parts of book
-Favorite: Daisy's whole part. Least favorite: when Philip refuses candy
-Favorite: The whole book because I liked hearing about the creations. Least favorite: I didn't like hearing about the sorrow when Daisy disappeared.
-Favorite: reading about the creations. My least favorite was the candy.
-Favorite: when Daisy revealed that she was a spy. I didn't have a least favorite.
-Favorite: when Logan was sitting on the beach and Philip opened the thing and it was the toy truck. Least favorite when Henry told Philip what really happened.


Rated from 1-5 

-Two 3s
-Three 4s
-One 5


We will be meeting on Wednesday, November 15 at 3:00 p.m. in order to discuss Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery.

'Oh, it seems so wonderful that I'm going to live with you and belong to you. I've never belonged to anybody'

When a scrawny, freckled girl with bright red hair arrives on Prince Edward Island, Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert are taken by surprise; they'd asked for a quiet boy to help with the farm work at Green Gables. But how can you return a friendless child to a grim orphanage when she tells you her life so far has been a 'perfect graveyard of buried hopes'? And so, the beguiling chatterbox stays. Full of dreams, warmth and spirit, it is not long before Anne Shirley wins their hearts.-amazon.com



Copies of the next month's book can be picked up at the Circulation Desk a few days after the previous month's discussion. Please be sure to register so that Miss Lisa knows how many snacks to purchase!

September Grades 5-6 Book Club: The Evil Wizard Smallbone

For September's Grades 5-6 Book Club, we read The Evil Wizard Smallbone by Delia Sherman. Anthony, J.T., Madison and Reagan were ...